Giving Afghan Women Their Self-Worth through Work


Mutabeqa is an extraordinary woman in her culture because she is doing something that most women in developed countries are already doing – work.

As a woman, working is out of the norm and can be considered a disgrace in her Afghan culture.

Unmarried and having to support her mother, Mutabeqa’s superb embroidery and leadership skills made her stand out in her community, making her an important asset of Zardozi, a sewing centre for Afghan women that works with families in refugee camps.

Mutabeqa’s work is deemed a disgrace to her family by her brothers, who abandoned her and their mother, because a working woman is still unaccepted in the Afghan culture. This is a perception that non-governmental organizations (NGO) such as Zardozi hopes to change.

Playing an important role at Zardozi, Mutabeqa’s role is to check on the quality of handmade goods and make sure the artisans are paid on time. Zardozi plays the vital link between the artisans and the mass consumer market, ensuring the appeal and quality of products are top-notch to keep these artisans’ livelihood sustainable.

A story like Mutabeqa’s is amazing yet hers is one of the many stories of resilient women in Afghanistan who are willing to forego family disgrace in order to focus on the practical needs of her family and immediate community.

Since 1984, Zardozi has been providing employment for over 3000 families at refugee camps along the Pakistani border. Marketing these handmade goods to the global marketplace, Zardozi helps to ensure that the refugee families have money to provide themselves with basic health and afford education. Because of the closure of refugee camps in 2008, Zardozi continued to provide employment for these families even after they moved back to eastern Afghanistan, so that their income would have some form of continuity.

The beauty of embroidered Zardozi products. Photo: Zardozi

In 2007, Zardozi set up Ganjina, a craft centre situated strategically in Kabul, Afghanistan, a prime location for trade to take place. Some of the handmade products that are sold there include jewelry, shoes, accessories, clothing, books, visual arts, calligraphy etc.

Zardozi currently employs more than 60 people in manufacturing products, product sales as well as camp outreach.

Some of Zardozi’s beautiful range of products can be found at The Hunger Site, where every purchase ensures a certain percentage goes to the purchase of free books for children in need, making education for the next generation possible. Like Zardozi, The Hunger Site supports the provision of fair wages to artisans.

To hear stories from the Afghan artisan women directly check out the video below, which promotes the sale of Afghan artisan products from The Hunger Site:


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